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June 2020

Math Kitchen Party: organized by Tim Alderson (UNB Saint John)

June 18, 2020 @ 8:00 pm - 9:00 pm
Zoom seminar

Pokemon in the City Danny Dyer (Memorial University of Newfoundland)  When playing Pokemon Go, trying to catch all the Pokemon in a big, grid like city is difficult, but can be discussed in terms of the watchman number of grid graphs. We present some bounds for these graphs, and argue that is better to play Pokemon Go on a toroidal space station. Gotta catch ‘em all!  Passing the buck: a chip firing game M.E. Messenger (Mount Allison) Suppose a group…

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Math Kitchen Party: organized by Patrick Reynolds (UNB Fredericton)

June 25, 2020 @ 8:00 pm - 9:00 pm
Zoom seminar

Source Sink Diffusion Danielle Cox (MSVU) We will introduce the diffusion process on graphs with the addition of sources and sinks. In particular, we will provide some results regarding the periodicity of the process. This is joint work with Todd Mullen (Dalhousie University), Shayne Breen (MSVU), Emily Wright (MSVU) and Jesse Preston (MSVU). More Fun with the Sierpinski Relatives Tara Taylor (StFX) The Sierpinski gasket is a well-known fractal that can be described as the attractor of an iterated function…

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July 2020

Math Kitchen Party: organized by Branimir Cacic (UNB Fredericton)

July 2, 2020 @ 8:00 pm - 9:00 pm
Zoom seminar

The Oberwolfach Problem Andrea Burgess (UNB Saint John) The Oberwolfach Problem was posed by Ringel as a seating problem: $n$ people attend a conference in Oberwolfach, where the dining room has round tables of sizes $k_1, k_2, \ldots, k_t$ (with $k_1 + \cdots + k_t = n$). Is it possible to devise a seating plan over successive dinners in which each person sits next to each other person exactly once? In graph-theoretical terms, the Oberwolfach Problem asks whether, given a…

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Math Kitchen Party: organized by Daniele Turchetti (Dalhousie)

July 9, 2020 @ 8:00 pm - 9:00 pm
Zoom seminar

Number Theory in Quantum Mechanics Suresh Eswarathasan (Dalhousie | 8:00-8:20) In this lecture, I will discuss some concrete connections between two seemingly disparate fields: number theory and quantum mechanics. The first 10 minutes will be spent giving some “standard” facts in these disciplines before spending the last 10 minutes on the implications of the Sum of Two Squares Theorem (or rather, its refinements) on certain quantum waves. Getting Back to Your Roots Jason Brown (Dalhousie | 8:40-9:00) Polynomials arise in…

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Math Kitchen Party: organized by Danielle Cox (Mount Saint Vincent)

July 16, 2020 @ 8:00 pm - 9:00 pm
Zoom seminar

Modelling correlated count data-can I delete the zeroes? Gary Sneddon (Mount Saint Vincent) Correlated count data with excess zeroes arise in a number of applications. We will discuss 3 motivating examples, and some approaches to modelling these type of data. Covid-19 may be mentioned, so be prepared. This is joint work with Tariqul Hasan and Renjun Ma of UNB (Fredericton). The Shooter’s Hill Decorative Tiles: Combinatorics as Art Karyn McLellan (Mount Saint Vincent) This talk will explore some of the…

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Math Kitchen Party: organized by Asmita Sodhi (Dalhousie) and Rebecca McKay (UNB Saint John)

July 23, 2020 @ 8:00 pm - 9:00 pm
Zoom seminar

Tips and Tricks for Online Teaching Rebecca McKay (UNB Saint John) Many of us will be teaching with some online component in Fall 2020. In this brief talk, I will outline some tips and tricks for moving mathematics and statistics course activities into the virtual environment. Open Discussion Session: 8:30-8:50 This is a virtual zoom meeting.  If you would like to attend, please email the organizers for connection details.

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August 2020

Math Kitchen Party: organized by Connie Stewart (UNB Saint John)

August 6, 2020 @ 8:00 pm - 9:00 pm
Zoom seminar

Hierarchical linear model with power law function on transmission of COVID-19 in Italy: Modelling and regression analysis Youtian Hao (UNB Fredericton) COVID-19 growth data were typically collected from each region of a country, and the transmission rate usually varies in different area. By adopting a power law with exponential cutoff function into hierarchical linear model, it becomes possible to reveal the relationship between COVID-19 transmission rate and some regional level covariates of interest. A two-level hierarchical linear model is constructed,…

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